GENERAL CONDITIONS FOR THE PRODUCTION AND EXHIBITION OF IMAGES

1. Within our current cultural and technological condition, wherein image production is potentially endless and infinite, wherein human vision can be captured in real time and without end, to engage with depicting the natural world in a temporal space outside of live-feed transmission (i.e. focussed on particular moments) necessitates radical editing.
2. If, in the past, the photographer’s goal was to search for conditions allowing for singular images and to capture them at an ideal moment (or allow them to pass forever unrecorded), the photographer today is in the position of capturing many or all moments, then searching for the singular images within them.
3. If the photographer’s role shifts from image capturer to image editor, the photographer’s emphasis must shift from the recording of singular moment to pluralistic moments, from subject to situation.

4. This shift suggests that, if the photographer once searched the outside world for specific moments, now a set of potential situations or possible scenarios based on probability or improbability of potential culturally relevant images must be constructed.


5. The image capturer is superseded by the image recordist. The moment is superseded by the situation. Singular images are superseded by footage. The recording process is superseded by the editing process. All given conditions of the production and exhibition of images are suspended and malleable.


6. The physical relationship between the recording device and the subject of the recording is still based on spatio-temporal material realities. Unlike simulations, not all moments are viewable from all potential angles and distances. This presumes that the role of the recordist is still important for the production of culturally relevant images. 


7. The physical relationship between the image and the viewer is still based on spatio-temporal material realities. Unlike computers, the human mind can only process a finite number of images in space or in secession. This presumes that we must still consider the specifics of viewing conditions in which images are presented as primary to their reception.


8. The temporal and monetary conditions of the former model of image capturer necessarily supposes the subjectivity of the photographer. The selection of singular images from within existing footage within the new model also necessitates subjectivity. The levels of production, of editing, and of presentation each involve layers of subjectivity, each of which can be utilized or mitigated based on the needs of the producer or producers of images.



REGARDING CONDITIONS OF PRODUCTION


1. The conditions of recording and/or editing may be imposed by the producer or producers.
2. The conditions of recording and/or editing may be imposed by a third party at the request of the producer or producers.
3. The conditions of recording and/or editing may be imposed by pre-existing conditions, by chance procedures, or other compositional/anti-compositional strategies, at the behest of the producer or producers.
4. All these conditions must take into account the potential for a multiplicity of images, as they can best be used to exploit the discursive qualities of the others (montage) in relation to the conditions of their exhibition (space and time) and their actual and potential social conditions (viewers).

REGARDING PRODUCTION


1. The recordist need not be the editor of the footage.
2. The editor need not be the recordist of the footage.
3. The producer or producers of the image(s) may occupy both, one, or neither roles.


REGARDING EXHIBITION

1. The material conditions of the exhibition may be imposed by the producer or producers, and/or the given properties of the situation in which it takes place.
2. The technological conditions of the exhibition may be imposed by the producer or producers,and/or the given properties of the situation in which it takes place.
3. The spatial conditions of the exhibition may be imposed by the producer or producers, and/or the given properties of the situation in which it takes place.
4. The temporal conditions of the exhibition may be imposed by the producer or producers, and/or the given properties of the situation in which it takes place.
5. All elements can and must be considered part of the material of the images themselves, as they relate to the world in which they were produced and they exist.

REGARDING DEPICTION


Depiction implies reflection. Objective recording is by nature not reflective. Only by reflectively editing and re-presenting objective recordings of social space can images of human conditions and activities provide space for cultural and political critique. To depict and present the world to itself is itself a political act. 



AS SUCH:

1. We believe in depiction.
2. We believe in using any means necessary to create relevant depictions of human beings.
3. We believe in presenting depictions of human beings to human beings.
4. We believe in utilizing all material, technological, spatial, and temporal conditions available to us in order to present these depictions.
5. We believe that montage is the discursive space that can best exploit all given conditions.


AND AS SUCH:


1. We will create the conditions for images to be recorded;
2. We will create the conditions for images to be selected;
3. We will create the conditions for images to be exhibited;
within the context of the primacy of their relation to:
1. Other images with which they can exist;
2. Spaces of presentation within which they can exist;
3. The viewer for whom they exist;
as best they can act discursively within these conditions.

Time is the material of all discourse.

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Addendum #1: Regarding Singular Images

Every photographic image is made under specific temporal, spatial, and social conditions. All unique properties of each condition negate all alternate possible images.

1. Every photographic image is an index to the time and conditions in which it was recorded.
2. When an image is printed It becomes an index to the time and conditions in which it was printed.
3. When a printed image is exhibited it becomes an index to the time and conditions in which it was exhibited.
4. When stewardship of an exhibited image is transferred it becomes an index to the time and conditions in which it was acquired.

Each image must be considered as a network of indices, with none of the aforementioned conditions being more or less privileged as pertains reception in relation to meaning and/or cultural value.

Addendum #2: Regarding Multiple Images

Every photographic image is made under specific temporal, spatial, and social conditions. within these conditions it is possible to record either one or multiple images.

1. Every image exists within a temporal, spatial, and social context.
2. When multiple images are placed within these conditions, associative juxtapositions provide the possibility of the construction of meaning.
3. The producer of image networks can construct associative juxtapositions, but only a viewer can provide discursive value.
4. The discursive potential of the image is amplified within a multiplicity of images.

To exploit the greatest potential for the production of culturally relevant/valuable images, images must be produced and distributed within a multiplicity of images, and the producer must construct the temporal, spatial, and social conditions within which they may be presented as can best exploit their discursive potential.